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Monday, 25 March 2013

Negotiating Interest Rates


Negotiating Interest Rates

 
 Would you ever buy a car or book a vacation without shopping around? Well the same theory applies when choosing a mortgage rate. The First thing you need to know is it is possible to negotiate with lenders for a better rate. It just requires them to take a lower commission. Always keep in mind a quote is just a quote, until you are accepting an offer.
Be informed. A mortgage contracts is a beneficial agreement between you and your lender. Shop around and know what’s available. Another way to do this is to learn the language. Knowing what you are looking for and the terminology, presents you as an educated shopper. Don’t give people the chance to present you with a less than perfect offer because you don’t understand the terms. 
Also know your own strengths. If you have a good credit rating, strong assets and documentable income, you are eligible for a great rate. Don’t be intimidated. You’ve worked hard and deserve to be treated fairly.
Shop around. Remember you are looking for what suits your financial situation best. Likely your bank will offer you a great rating, as a valued customer, but don’t stop there. Talk to multiple institutions. 
Mortgage brokers provide a free service, so make use of that as well. When doing this, always get a written quote. You want to be clear what is being offered.
Banks usually have great customer service policies. Don’t underestimate the value of being able to negotiate with someone. 
More than a rate. A great interest rate is important, but there are other things to consider. Associated costs and terms can drive up your closing price. You’re looking for the lowest total. Also you don’t want to be surprised down the road. Learn about penalties for making extra payments and what happens if you sell your house before your mortgage is paid in full.
Hidden cost of appraisals and document fees may seem minor when spending thousands, but you’ve earned this money. Often your home bank can waive these fees. It’s worth asking. The lender is being paid by you, let them earn it. 
Give yourself extra time. Pressure to close can leave you scrambling. Taking the time to compare rates and bottom lines is a huge advantage. This is your purchase, settle it the best you can on your terms. 
 Realize you are just another mortgage to the leaders do not be intimated. Ask for a discounted rate and be prepared to move on if they will not come down to a lower rate. By asking for a discount you can save thousands of dollars over the life of the mortgage.

Its your money! Lets try and keep more of it.

Any Questions always feel free to call me.

Todd Fryer
Sales Representative
Century 21
905 869-3473
www.toddfryer.com

Sunday, 17 March 2013

Carbon Monoxide


Carbon Monoxide

The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning



Carbon monoxide is often referred to as "the silent killer." This odorless, colourless and tasteless gas, is nearly impossible to detect and also extremely lethal. Homeowners must take extra safety precautions to control the dangers of carbon monoxide in their homes. 
 
What Happens 
When carbon monoxide is absorbed through inhalation it immediately begins depleting your body’s cells of oxygen. Carbon monoxide is absorbed faster than oxygen by red blood cells. As it replaces the oxygen in your blood it also starves cells and vital organs of their required oxygen. Affects of carbon monoxide poisoning are dependent on the amount of exposure you have had. While some affects are only short term, many can be long term as well as fatal. In some cases death occurs in minutes. 
 
Occurrence and Exposure 
Carbon monoxide occurs when organic compounds burn, such as motor vehicle exhaust, fires, engine fumes and non-electrical heaters. It is found in fumes of automobiles, small gasoline engines, stoves, lanterns, burning charcoal and wood, gas ranges and heating systems. Danger can occur when there a problem with ventilation creating a buildup in enclosed or semi-enclosed space. Symptoms of exposure can be very diverse, from headaches to chest pain, weakness to confusion and seizures. Be aware of all the symptoms. 
 
Prevention
Your best defense is to have all heating systems, water heaters and gas, coal or oil burning appliances serviced yearly by qualified technicians. Install battery operated carbon monoxide detectors at knee level and check them on a bi-yearly basis. A good idea as a reminder is to ensure they are in good working order every fall and spring when you change your clocks. 
Keeping chimneys free of bird’s nests, leaves and debris will ensure proper ventilation and will prevent any type of carbon monoxide buildup. 
Always use items that create carbon monoxide with care. Never use these items indoors, in garages or near windows. All areas must be well ventilated and more than 20 feet away from your home. This includes never running a vehicle in a garage.  
 
Most importantly, take these precautions seriously. Consider all alarms to be accurate and evacuate immediately. Call 911 and wait for the fire department to access your situation.
With the clocks going ahead last week you should have changed your Smoke Detector and Carbon Monoxide batteries. I have seen to many times what happens when this simple chore is neglected.

Any Questions always feel free to call me.

Todd Fryer
Sales Representative
Century 21
905 869-3473
www.toddfryer.com

Tuesday, 12 March 2013


Germs!

 


 It has been a bad cold and flu season and it has all been caused by a microscopic organism called "The Germ". You cant completely wipe out these harmful little guys but with minimal effort you can make your home a less likely place to get sick.

Sniffling, sneezing, coughing...sound familiar at this time of year? If you have children, it's even harder to avoid being exposed to viruses. Germs are everywhere and one of the best ways to try to keep you and your family healthy is by germ-proofing your home.
 
Bacteria and viruses can live on surfaces for up to 48 hours, so it’s a must to fight back and keep your home and the high traffic areas clean. Some of the germiest places in your house include doorknobs, faucets, computer keyboards, appliance handles, telephones, children’s toys, toilet handles, and the remote control. Gross right? Kill germs by disinfecting these surfaces. If someone is sick at home, disinfect daily.
 
According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, as of January 5, 2013 there have been 13,073 confirmed cases of influenza in Canada. Influenza is spread from person to person through droplets, like sneezing and saliva, and by touching objects and surfaces that are contaminated with the virus. So cleaning the surfaces your hands touch is most important.
 
Most of the disinfectant products contain chemicals that can be hazardous to your health. Try cleaning with white vinegar - it’s a great way to keep your home germ free, it’s non-toxic and eliminates most bacteria, mold and germs. You can also use essential lavender oil which is another germ fighter. Add several drops of it to a cup of water in a spritz bottle and use it to disinfect your kitchen and bathroom.
 
Next, make sure to wash your hands well and often as it’s the most effective thing you can do to protect yourself against influenza and the common cold. Not only will it help keep you healthy, it will help prevent the spread of infectious diseases to others. Make sure you wash your hands before and after handling food, after going to the bathroom, and when you come home. Also teach your children these good hand washing habits to prevent germs. Place bottles of hand sanitizer in several locations around the house to encourage use in addition to frequent hand-washing. Also remember not to cough or sneeze into your hands, spreading germs as you touch things. Instead cough into fabric, like your sleeve.
 
It’s almost impossible to completely avoid germs, but the more effort you put into germ-proofing your home the better chances you’ll have to keep your family healthy.

Friday, 8 March 2013

Estate Planning 101


Estate Planning 101


 You’ve worked hard to save, buy investments and pay down your home. Most likely you want these assets to go to the people you choose for it to go to when you eventually pass on. And, if you’re like most Canadians, you would like to reduce the taxes on your assets to a minimum. Estate planning is simply arranging what happens to your assets in the event of your death.
 
In estate planning, the most important step in organizing your assets so you make the choices is to make a will. Dying without a will, or intestate, means that on your death the provincial government chooses how your assets are distributed. Usually, the first $50,000 of value goes to the surviving spouse and rest is divided among the children. In addition to losing choices, there are also additional delays and fees associated with dying intestate. These delays could be financial burdens to your family.
 
Getting a professionally prepared Last Will and Testament is the most important first step in planning your estate. Ensure once your will is complete that your financial and/or investment advisors are aware of your final wishes. That way, they will take steps that are in keeping with your final plans.
 
The Ontario probate fee is generally a 1.4 per cent tax applied to the entire value of your estate. There are some steps that can help you reduce or avoid paying probate, but take care that they don’t carry more negative consequences than the fee itself.
 
When you make a will, you must appoint an executor. Give careful consideration to who you appoint as executor. The responsibility is time-consuming and complex and the stress of dealing with grief and financials can be challenging. It may also create family strife if, for example, one sibling is appointed over another, especially if the process takes longer than expected.
 
Once you make a will, make a point to review its contents regularly—perhaps once every year or two. An out-of-date will can slow down the process and may cost more in probate or other fees as courts try to track down assets you no longer have. New additions to the family may not be included while those who are no longer members, due to divorces or deaths, may still be listed. Regularly updating your will is a good strategy to make sure your plans are still accurate.
 
If you are a high net-worth individual, discuss options in more detail with estate planning professionals and financial advisors. Plans, such as trust funds, may be good choices for transferring your assets sooner, rather than later.
 
For more information on estate planning, visit www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/english/justice-ont/estate_planning.asp.
 
Any further questions or assistance please contact me anytime.

Todd Fryer
Sales Representative
Century 21 Aberwin Realty
(905) 869-3473

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

March Newsletter

If you would like to advertise your event in the newsletter please let me know